Saturday, May 10, 2008

Seeing and Seeing More

The first I remember giving it any thought was in Ludden Elementary School. We took a test where we looked at a picture and then wrote down things we observed. The goal was to see the most things in the picture. I did a little better than my classmates and took some pride in that. Doing that little bit better and learning there were techniques for observing appealed to what little competitiveness I had in me. It began a lifelong hobby of learning to observe in greater detail and trying to teach others to observe in greater detail when I have the opportunity. So I have learned techniques. And because nature is so important to me, I take the time and effort to apply them to the natural world. When you first start to apply techniques like these, they seemed forced and unnatural. But after going through the steps purposefully, after a while they become part of how you see, part of your personal habit of observation, and it will feel natural. The next few posts will cover specific techniques for seeing more. You can find others’ suggestions and ideas for gaining better observation skills, on line and in books, but you must take the time at first to go through the steps to apply the techniques until they do become habit, part of your own unique way of seeing. Yes, greater detail in observation is a gift that some are born with, but it is also a skill that can be learned, developed, and enhanced so that you can enjoy a rich medley of sights, sounds, tactile sensations, and fragrances every time you are surrounded by nature. Get out there and look around!

3 comments:

Gene Redlin said...

is that first picture that little ground cover Cornus canadensis? It looks like it but it's been a long time since I've seen one.

Anonymous said...

I don't see Waldo anywhere in here...

goprairie said...

Prairie trillium. The one that grows in the savanna under the oaks. And in the woods that used to be savanna. Only gets those 3 leaves then the center opens up to a 3 petaled flower. Mottled leaves. Sometimes called toad trillium for the mottled leaves. There might be a photo of it open on allprairie.blogspot.com